Oven-Roasted Tomatoes (Tomato Confit)

5 from 2 votes
3 hours 45 minutes
Jump To Recipe

This slow oven-roasted tomatoes recipe, based on the classic French preservation method of confit is a great way to preserve summer tomato goodness! Try on grilled bread, on charcuterie boards, in pasta, as a way to bump up the flavor of jarred marinara or other sauces such as puttanesca sauce or on salads for a taste of summer all year long!

Tomato Confit in glass jar garnished with fresh thyme sprigs.

Why This Recipe is a Keeper!

When you don’t know what else to do with a summer tomato bounty, slowly roasting tomatoes in the oven is a lovely way to preserve some of that REAL tomato flavor. This oven-roasted tomato recipe is adapted from one by Daniel Boulud so you know it has to be good!

Although small tomatoes such as cherry or grape are generally used in a tomato confit, this slow-roasted tomato recipe uses plum (or Roma) tomatoes cooked with herbs, garlic and a touch of sugar which helps to caramelize the tomatoes. I used plum tomatoes because we had a plum tomato bounty and they’re low-moisture.

Slow-roasting concentrates the flavor of the tomato–much like a sun-dried tomato–but without the leathery texture and cloying sweetness.

Tomato Confit in glass jar garnished with fresh thyme sprigs on white distressed background.

What is Confit?

Pronounced con-FEE, this French adjective basically means “preserved.” Often used with duck, this preservation method takes place by slowly cooking food in a liquid that’s inhospitable to bacteria such as pure fat. This method can also be applied to fruits and vegetables. Here’s everything you ever wanted to know about confit from Serious Eats.

How to Make Oven-Roasted Tomatoes (Tomato Confit):

Recipe Ingredients:

Here’s everything you’ll need to make this recipe along with how to prep. See the roasted tomato recipe card below for the exact quantities.

Ingredients for Tomato Confit.

Ingredient Notes and Substitutions:

  • Fresh Herbs: Here’s where you definitely want to use fresh herbs. Dried herbs will only dry more.
  • Olive Oil: You don’t have to go all out here because the oil will be heated. Just use a decent extra-virgin olive oil for the slow-roasting. If storing the tomatoes in a jar and using them within a short period of time, drizzle the confited tomatoes with the best olive oil you have.
  • Tomatoes: Use plum (Roma) tomatoes that are ripe yet still firm. Overripe tomatoes will be difficult to work with.

Step-By-Step Instructions:

  • Gather, prep and measure out all the ingredients.
  • Start by removing the skin from the tomatoes.
    • Prepare an ice bath then bring a saucepan of water to a boil.
    • Cut an “X” in the bottom of each plum tomato then carefully drop it into the boiling water.
    • Give it about 20-30 seconds or until you can see the skin begin to peel away from the tomato.
    • Immerse into the ice bath to stop the cooking process.
Roma tomatoes after being blanched in ice water in glass bowl.
  • Remove the skins, cut in half and remove the seeds.
Nine whole skinned tomatoes and 14 peeled, halved and seeded tomatoes on white cutting board.
  • Place the tomato halves on a baking sheet then drizzle with olive oil. Add the thyme, bay leaves, garlic, salt, pepper and sugar, tucking them in under the tomatoes.
  • Place in the oven at 275 degrees and slow roast for 1 1/2 hours, opening the door slightly once or twice to allow for any accumulated steam to escape.
  • At 1 1/2 hours, they should look like this…
Confit tomatoes on white enameled baking sheet.
  • Flip then continue roasting at 275 degrees for another 1 1/2 hours.
Confit tomatoes on white enameled baking sheet.
  • They should then be deep red in color and beautifully soft.
Tomato Confit on white enameled baking sheet.
  • Let the roasted tomatoes cool then transfer to a jar.
Tomato Confit in glass jar garnished with fresh thyme.
  • Drizzle the slow-roasted tomatoes with great olive oil to cover then refrigerate.
Tomato Confit being drizzled with olive oil.
  • Refrigerate the roasted tomatoes for up to 6-7 days. Afterward, divide into small portions and freeze, oil and all.

Chef Tips and Tips:

  • The plum tomatoes should be ripe yet still firm. If you use overripe tomatoes, they’ll be difficult to work with.
  • At least twice during the roasting process, open the oven door slightly to allow any steam that has built up in the oven to be released.
Tomato Confit in glass jar with thyme sprigs.

Frequently Asked Questions:

How long will slow-roasted tomatoes last in the refrigerator?

6-7 days is the limit as with most cooked food. After that, simply divide it up into small portions and place in small snack-size zipper-top bags or other small airtight containers and place in the freezer.

What are ways to use oven-roasted tomatoes?

Use anywhere you want a concentrated tomato flavor.  Uses include salads, pasta, add to purchased tomato sauce to improve the flavor, crostini, charcuterie or antipasto boards and mashed as a “whole” form of tomato paste.

More ways to preserve summer tomato goodness!

Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus, get great new recipes from me every week!
Save Recipe
* By submitting this form, you consent to receive emails.
Logo for From A Chef's Kitchen with gray oval border and green knife.
Tomato Confit in glass jar garnished with fresh thyme.

Oven-Roasted Tomatoes (Tomato Confit)

5 from 2 votes

Click to Rate!

By: Carol | From A Chef’s Kitchen
Slow oven-roasted tomatoes, based on the classic French preservation method of confit are a great way to preserve summer tomato goodness! Try on grilled bread, on charcuterie boards, in pasta, as a way to bump up the flavor of jarred marinara or on salads for a taste of summer all year long!
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 3 hours
Total Time 3 hours 45 minutes
Course Appetizers and Snacks
Cuisine Italian
Servings 5
Calories 182 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 20 Roma (plum) tomatoes - ripe but firm, approximately 3 pounds
  • 8 large cloves garlic - peeled and sliced into thick slices
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme - leaves only
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper - to preference
  • 5 fresh bay leaves
  • 1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil - plus more for storing tomatoes
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar

Instructions
 

  • Prepare an ice bath. Bring a saucepan of water to a boil. Cut a small, shallow "X" in the bottom of each tomato.
  • Carefully drop the tomatoes, 5-6 at a time into the boiling water and cook 20-30 seconds or until the skin begins to loosen around the "X" in the bottom of each tomato. Transfer to the ice bath and repeat with the remaining tomatoes.
  • Peel the tomatoes and discard the skins. Blot dry on paper towels or a clean kitchen towel. Slice each tomato in half lengthwise and remove the seeds.
  • Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
  • Scatter the sliced garlic and half the thyme over a large, rimmed baking sheet.
  • Season the cut side of the tomatoes with salt and black pepper then arrange them, cut side down over the garlic and thyme.
  • Tuck the bay leaves around the tomatoes then drizzle the olive oil over the tomatoes, making sure each one is coated with oil. (A pastry brush helps.)
  • Season with a little more salt and black pepper, the remaining thyme leaves and the sugar.
  • Place in the oven and bake for 1 1/2 hours. Open the door slightly 1-2 times just to release some of the moisture that will build-up in the oven.
  • Flip the tomatoes and bake another 1 1/2 hours. Open the door slightly 1-2 times just to release some of the moisture that will build up in the oven. The tomatoes should be very tender, shriveled but still hold their shape.
  • Let cool to room temperature. Place in an airtight container and pour olive oil over the top. Refrigerate up to 1 week or freeze up to 6 months.

Notes

STORAGE:  Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 1 week.  To freeze, place in small snack-size zipper-top bags and freeze for up to 6 months.
USES:  Use anywhere you want a concentrated tomato flavor.  Uses include:
  • Salads
  • Pasta
  • Chop and add to purchased tomato sauce to improve the flavor
  • Crostini
  • Charcuterie or antipasto boards
  • Mashed as a “whole” form of tomato paste

Nutrition

Serving: 1 | Calories: 182kcal | Carbohydrates: 12g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 15g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 11g | Sodium: 14mg | Potassium: 615mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 7g | Vitamin A: 2129IU | Vitamin C: 37mg | Calcium: 39mg | Iron: 1mg

These are estimated values generated from a nutritional database using unbranded products. Please do your own research with the products you’re using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

Did you make this recipe? Please leave a comment, star rating or post your photo on Instagram and tag @fromachefskitchen.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




3 Comments

  1. Perfect timing for tomato season. Can a meatier sandwich tomato be used? i.e.Sand Mountain from Alabama. If I cut them horizontally in half I can usually get most of the seeds out. These are about the best I’ve found here in northwest Florida. I miss my western PA tomatoes for sure. My hubs does not like thyme at all. What other herbs can be used please? I thought about tarragon but don’t know what 3 hours of heat would do to them. A variety of herb recommendations would be GREATLY appreciated!! Thank you, Carol 🙂