Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter

4.60 from 40 votes
35 minutes
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Pumpkin Ravioli uses purchased wonton wrappers and canned pumpkin for ease, creating a lovely and easy fall-inspired dinner for two! This pumpkin and pasta goodness is topped with a lovely, nutty sage-infused brown butter.

Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter in white pasta bowl garnished with toasted pecans and fried sage leaves.

Why This Recipe is a Keeper!

It’s that most wonderful time of year!  Pumpkin abounds in baked goods and desserts to soups and lattes in kitchens everywhere!

With all this pumpkin creativity, you may have a little extra on hand.  For example, when you purchase a can of pumpkin puree, typically 15 ounces, but your recipe calls for only 8 ounces (or 1 cup).  This recently happened to me, so I created this delicious Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter to use the remaining 7 ounces.

You could freeze the remainder and save it for another project, too.  Or, you could turn it into this simple, elegant pasta dinner for two to three people.

This pumpkin ravioli recipe:

  • Is easy! Purchased wonton skins and canned pumpkin puree cut down on the work of making ravioli with fresh pasta.
  • Turns simple ingredients into a stunning meal for two to three people.
  • Has the perfect sauce for pumpkin ravioli! A sage-infused brown butter is perfect with it!
  • Also makes a lovely starter (primo) for an Italian-themed dinner party for four people.

Let’s make it!

Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter in white pasta bowl garnished with toasted pecans and fried sage leaves.

How to Make Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter:

Recipe Ingredients:

Here’s everything you’ll need to make this pumpkin ravioli recipe, along with how to prep the ingredients. See the recipe card below for the exact quantities.

Ingredients for Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter in glass bowls.

Ingredient Notes and Substitutions:

  • Pumpkin Puree: Canned pumpkin puree is a terrific convenience product. The label on the can I recently purchased states the contents to be pumpkin only with no added ingredients—not even salt. Pumpkin pie filling has spices added.  Use plain, canned pumpkin or your homemade pumpkin puree for this dish.
  • Wonton Skins: Wonton skins (also called wonton wrappers) are small (3.5 by 3.5 inches), thin sheets of dough made from flour, egg, and water. Look for them in the refrigerated section of most grocery stores.
  • Parmesan Cheese: Use good quality, full-flavored Parmesan cheese (domestic) or even Parmigiano-Reggiano (Italian origin). You can also use Romano or Asiago cheese.
  • Fresh Sage: Fresh sage for this recipe is a must! While raw, uncooked sage leaves are safe to eat, the flavor is unpalatable. Frying them in the butter flavors the butter and gives them a lovely, crispy texture with a woodsy flavor.
  • Butter: I usually purchase unsalted butter for cooking. However, salted butter is acceptable because you need to add salt anyway.
  • Pecans: Nuts add a nice textural touch. Other options are walnuts, hazelnuts, pinenuts, or macadamia nuts. Pinenuts and hazelnuts are traditionally used in the original Italian version.  However, I like pecans for a Southern touch.

Step-By-Step Instructions:

  • Gather and prep all the ingredients for the pumpkin ravioli recipe.
  • In a small bowl, combine canned pumpkin puree, 1/3 cup grated Parmesan (or Romano or Asiago) cheese, cayenne if using, and salt and black pepper to taste. Set aside.
Pumpkin puree with parmesan cheese in glass bowl mixed together.
  • Place 12 wonton skins on a flat, non-stick surface lightly dusted with all-purpose flour. Divide the filling equally, placing approximately 1 tablespoon in the center of each wonton skin.
  • Brush around the outside of the filling with beaten egg.
  • Carefully place another wonton skin over the filling.
  • Gently stretch it to make the edges come together neatly, removing any air pockets from the ravioli.
  • Repeat until 12 ravioli are assembled.
  • Repeat until 12 ravioli are assembled.
12 sealed pumpkin ravioli on parchment paper-lined rimmed baking sheet.
  • Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add olive oil.
  • Place the butter in a saucepan or skillet over medium heat to make the sauce for the pumpkin ravioli.
  • When the butter has melted and begins to simmer, reduce the heat to low and let it continue simmering until it starts to turn a light golden brown.
  • Add the sage leaves and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, being careful the butter does not get overly browned or burned.
  • Remove from heat and set aside.
  • Remove sage with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. (Try not to take too much butter with the leaves.)
  • NOTE: There’s no need to transfer the butter to a bowl as shown. The photo is meant to demonstrate what the color of the butter should be.
  • Working in batches, place 4 ravioli in the boiling water.
  • Cook for 2 minutes or until they float slightly (they don’t need to come all the way to the top as they will cook quickly).
  • Remove with a slotted spoon and drain in a colander.
  • Repeat with remaining ravioli.
  • To serve, place ravioli on a plate.
  • Drizzle with brown butter, leaving any dark browned milk solids behind in the saucepan.
  • Top with sage leaves (fried and slivers), Parmesan (or Romano or Asiago) cheese, and toasted pecans.
  • Serve immediately.
Two bowls of Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter garnished with toasted pecans and fried sage leaves.

Chef Tips and Tricks:

  • Although salted or unsalted butter can be used to make brown butter, unsalted tends to work better.
  • While garnishing a dish with fresh herbs is always tempting, fresh sage is overpowering.  For this pumpkin ravioli recipe, I cook sage leaves in the butter until they’re just crispy to infuse it with flavor.  I add only a few slivers of fresh sage for a touch of color.
  • Pressing as much air as possible from each pumpkin ravioli is important because the air will expand, and the ravioli can burst. This part can be time-consuming, but it’s essential!  Just keep working the air pockets out from around the pumpkin filling.
  • Toasting nuts such as the pecans in this pumpkin ravioli brings out their flavor. However, nuts can go from zero to burned quickly, so I don’t do them in the oven. Instead, I prefer to toast them in a dry, nonstick skillet over medium-low heat. Toasting them in a dry skillet allows you to toss them around so they get toasted evenly. Keep your eye on them, be aware of how they smell, and get them off the heat onto a plate or into a bowl if they begin to smell burned.
Toasted pecans in nonstick skillet.
  • Then use the nuts to garnish this lovely Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter!
Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter in white pasta bowl garnished with toasted pecans and fried sage leaves.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What is brown butter?

Brown butter is simply butter cooked beyond the melting stage until it browns. To make it, place it in a saucepan and bring it to a simmer over medium heat. Then, reduce the heat to low and let it cook a bit. It may appear nothing is happening, but the water in the butter is being cooked off. The color of the butter will begin to change to a light golden brown, and you’ll see browned bits forming at the bottom of the pan.  These are milk solids, which you want to leave behind in the pan.

What if I don’t have enough pumpkin puree for 12 pumpkin ravioli?

No problem! Add ricotta or mascarpone cheese to make up the difference.

Can I make pumpkin ravioli ahead of time?

Yes, I’ve done it for personal chef clients; I advise them to boil them within 24 hours of my leaving. After filling the ravioli, transfer them to a fresh parchment paper-lined sheet pan that is very lightly dusted with all-purpose flour. (You want to get them away from any egg residue after brushing and sealing the ravioli because they can stick.) Place another piece of parchment over the ravioli, then securely enclose the ravioli in plastic wrap and refrigerate. The butter sauce for the pumpkin ravioli can also be made 24 hours in advance and very gently reheated in short bursts in the microwave. Place the sage leaves in an airtight container and store at room temperature.

Storage:

  • Refrigerate any leftovers. Reheat covered in the microwave.

Serve pumpkin ravioli with:

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Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter in white pasta bowl garnished with toasted pecans and fried sage leaves.

Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Brown Butter

4.60 from 40 votes

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By: Carol | From A Chef’s Kitchen
Pumpkin Ravioli uses purchased wonton wrappers and canned pumpkin for ease, creating a lovely and easy fall-inspired dinner for two! This pumpkin and pasta goodness is topped with a lovely, nutty sage-infused brown butter.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Course Pizza and Pasta
Cuisine Italian
Servings 2 -3
Calories 984 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • Scant 1 cup (7 ounces) canned pumpkin puree - not pie filling
  • 1/3 cup finely grated Parmesan, Romano, or Asiago cheese - plus more for topping
  • Pinch cayenne pepper - optional
  • Salt and black pepper - to taste
  • All-purpose flour
  • 24 wonton skins
  • 1 large egg - beaten
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 stick unsalted butter
  • 6 large sage leaves - (or 8-10 medium)thinly sliced plus a leaf or two thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup toasted coarsely chopped pecans

Instructions
 

  • In a small bowl, combine canned pumpkin puree, 1/3 cup grated Parmesan (or Romano or Asiago) cheese, cayenne if using, and salt and black pepper to taste. Set aside.
  • Place 12 wonton skins on a flat, non-stick surface lightly dusted with all-purpose flour. Divide the filling equally, placing approximately 1 tablespoon in the center of each wonton skin.
  • Brush around the outside of the filling with beaten egg. Carefully place another wonton skin over the filling. Gently stretch it to make the edges come together neatly, removing any air pockets from the ravioli. Repeat until 12 ravioli are assembled.
  • Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil. Add olive oil.
  • Place the butter in a saucepan or skillet over medium heat. When the butter has melted and begins to simmer, reduce the heat to low and let it continue simmering until it starts to turn a light golden brown.
  • Add the sage leaves and cook for 1-2 minutes, being careful the butter does not get overly browned or burned. Remove from heat and set aside. Remove sage with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel. (Try not to take too much butter with the leaves.)
  • Working in batches, place 4 ravioli in the boiling water. Cook for 2 minutes or until they begin to float slightly (they don’t need to come all the way to the top as they will cook quickly).
  • Remove with a slotted spoon and drain in a colander. Repeat with remaining ravioli.
  • To serve, place ravioli on a plate. Drizzle with browned butter, leaving any browned milk solid bits behind in the saucepan. Top with sage leaves (both cooked and slivers), Parmesan (or Romano or Asiago) cheese and pecans. Serve immediately.

Notes

MAKE AHEAD:  After filling the pumpkin ravioli, transfer them to a fresh parchment paper-lined sheet pan that is very lightly dusted with all-purpose flour. (You want to get them away from any egg residue after brushing and sealing the ravioli because they can stick.) Place another piece of parchment over the ravioli, then securely enclose the ravioli in plastic wrap and refrigerate. The butter sauce for the pumpkin ravioli can also be made 24 hours in advance and very gently reheated in short bursts in the microwave. Place the sage leaves in an airtight container and store at room temperature.

Nutrition

Serving: 2-3 | Calories: 984kcal | Carbohydrates: 55g | Protein: 20g | Fat: 77g | Saturated Fat: 36g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 7g | Monounsaturated Fat: 30g | Trans Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 237mg | Sodium: 1209mg | Potassium: 194mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 1711IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 264mg | Iron: 4mg

These are estimated values generated from a nutritional database using unbranded products. Please do your own research with the products you’re using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

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4.60 from 40 votes (38 ratings without comment)

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14 Comments

    1. Hi, Traci, Thanks so very much and so happy you love this recipe! We sure enjoy it and love that the ingredients are so simple. Thanks again!

  1. 5 stars
    We just ate our first batch. We made GF pasta from scratch and left the assembled ravioli in the fridge overnight. Used pine nuts instead of pecans. These are excellent! Our second batch is in the freezer for a cold day.

    1. Hi, Teresa, Thanks so very much and so happy you enjoyed! Love that you made GF pasta and you can definitely vary the nuts. Thanks again!

  2. I appreciated how easy this recipe was! And my company loved it. It had a little too much of the straight-up pumpkin puree taste for me, so in future I’ll probably return to my go-to recipe for which the pumpkin puree is cooked down with sherry, shallots, etc. But I did value the simplicity of this and it did make things feel like fall!

  3. Found this recipe on Pinterest. My husband made ravioli dough from scratch and I used this filling and sauce recipe. It turned out wonderful! Perfect for Fall. Thank you for sharing the recipe.

    1. Hi, Amy, Thanks so much for your question. Yes, you can make ahead as I’ve done it for personal chef clients. Just be sure to seal it up tight so the wonton skins don’t dry out. Thanks again and hope you enjoy!

      1. Hi, Kelly, Thanks so much for your question. I have not frozen them but I don’t see why you can’t. I would freeze them flat between pieces of parchment paper in an airtight container. You shouldn’t have to thaw them; just drop into boiling water. Thanks again and please let me know how it goes.