Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce

5 from 7 votes
50 minutes
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Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce makes a fun side dish or party appetizer!  Salt-roasting makes the skins super crispy, the interior beautifully creamy and it’s the perfect cooking method for baby or “peewee” potatoes.

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce on black platter on gray background garnished with parsley.

The inspiration behind this recipe:

This recipe is one of those times that the cooking geek really comes out in me.

I recently picked up a copy of a cookbook from Better Homes and Gardens entitled Fresh:  Recipes for Enjoying Ingredients at Their Peak in the Barnes & Noble sale areaThis recipe caught my eye because it was so unusual.  As with most Better Homes and Gardens recipes, they are all tested pretty well before being published.

Dear Better Homes and Gardens:  This recipe needed some extra testing.

Salt-roasting potatoes–covering them up in a massive amount of salt and roasting them–is not new.  You won’t find many recipes online for skillet salt-roasting, however.  Salt-roasting, whether done in the oven or stovetop requires a very large amount of salt but you don’t consume the salt so ignore the sodium count in the nutritional analysis.

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce on black platter garnished with parsley.

The first time I made the recipe, I used regular small red new potatoes.  The second time, I used these adorable tiny potatoes that you may have noticed popping up in produce departments recently referred to as “peewee” potatoes.  I preferred the result from the “peewee” potatoes over the slightly larger ones because they cooked faster.

The Better Homes and Gardens recipe calls for fennel or caraway seeds in the salt.  After reading the result The Kitchn got which was no flavor from either the fennel or their use of coriander seeds, I thought I’d try something fresh like rosemary sprigs.  The rosemary sprigs didn’t flavor the potatoes at all either and I ended up with “smoked” rosemary which honestly was not that pleasant.  So instead, I went with plain old kosher salt and it’s the only way to go.

How to make Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce:

  • Start with approximately 2 pounds of baby or “peewee” potatoes.

Photo of freshly washed uncooked baby potatoes in white colander.

  • Pour 4 cups of the most inexpensive kosher salt you can find into a large cast iron skillet.  It’s important to use a cast iron skillet because of the dry heat.  And don’t worry, your skillet will be fine as long as you don’t store or let the salt sit in it overnight.
  • Preheat the skillet and the salt over medium heat for 5 minutes.
  • Nestle the potatoes into the salt, being careful the potatoes don’t touch the bottom of the skillet.  There needs to be some salt between the heat of the skillet and the potato or you’ll end up with blackened potatoes.

Photo of potatoes in cast iron skillet nestled in kosher salt ready to be skillet roasted.

  • Sprinkle a little salt over the potatoes.
  • Cover with heavy-duty aluminum foil and another large cover.

Photos of baby potatoes in cast iron skillet being sprinkled with salt.

  • Cook over medium-low heat for 35 to 40 minutes.
  • Turn off the heat and let the potatoes stand for 5 minutes.

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes after being roasted.

  • That’s it!  Skillet salt-roasted baby potatoes!  Divinely crispy skins with a creamy interior.  Mwaaahhhh!

Close-up photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes in skillet after roasting.

For the most part, the potatoes come right out of the salt, however, you may need to brush the salt off of a few.  After removing the excess salt, you could drizzle with good, fruity olive oil or toss with butter and sprinkle with fresh herbs and freshly cracked black pepper.

I love sour cream with roasted potatoes but I also think horseradish and potatoes are a match made in heaven so I created this sour cream horseradish sauce.  It’s super easy and can be mixed up while the potatoes roast.

Photo of Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce in glass bowl being stirred with white spoon.

That’s it!  Skillet Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce!

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce on black platter.

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes being dipped into Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce with wooden picks.

Photo of Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes being dipped into Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce.

I know you’re probably wondering then what to do with all that salt!  Here are some ideas:

  • Use in brine for chicken or turkey
  • Sprinkle over an icy patch on your sidewalk, driveway or patio.
  • Keep in a bucket in your kitchen to put out a small fire.

Be sure to try these other delicious potato recipes:

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Skillet Salt Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce - Overhead hero shot of potatoes on black platter, gray background garnished with parsley

Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce

5 from 7 votes

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By: Carol | From A Chef's Kitchen
Salt-Roasted Baby Potatoes with Sour Cream Horseradish Sauce makes a fun side dish or party appetizer!  Salt-roasting makes the skins super crispy, the interior beautifully creamy and it's the perfect cooking method for baby or "peewee" potatoes.
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes
Course Appetizers and Snacks
Cuisine American
Servings 8
Calories 148 kcal

Ingredients
  

Potatoes

  • 4 cups kosher salt
  • 2 pounds baby potatoes - or peewee potatoes
  • Parsley - for garnish

Sour Cream - Horseradish Sauce

  • 1 scallion - white and light green part only, minced
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup creamy horseradish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon coarse-grain mustard
  • Dash of Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt and white pepper - to taste

Instructions
 

Potatoes

  • Pour salt into a large cast iron skillet.
  • Place over medium heat and heat for 5 minutes.
  • Nestle the potatoes into the salt, being careful the potatoes do not touch the bottom of the skillet.
  • Cover securely with heavy-duty aluminum foil then cover again with a large pan cover or baking sheet.
  • Reduce heat to medium-low and cook for 35-40 minutes or until skins are crispy and potatoes can be easily pierced with a paring knife.
  • ALTERNATIVELY: Cover with salt as much as possible. Bake in a 425-degree oven for 35-40 minutes or until tender and can be easily pierced with a knife.
  • Let rest 5 minutes off the heat.
  • Remove from salt, scraping off any excess as necessary.
  • Garnish with chopped fresh parsley.

Sour Cream - Horseradish Sauce

  • Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Serve with potatoes.

Notes

MAKE AHEAD:  Sour Cream - Horseradish Sauce can be made 1-2 days ahead of time.  Refrigerate until needed.

Nutrition

Serving: 1 | Calories: 148kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 15mg | Sodium: 56670mg | Potassium: 555mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 198IU | Vitamin C: 25mg | Calcium: 87mg | Iron: 1mg

These are estimated values generated from a nutritional database using unbranded products. Please do your own research with the products you're using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

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7 Comments

    1. Hi, Melissa, Thanks so much for your great question! I was reluctant to suggest reusing the salt for another batch of potatoes. Because salt draws liquid out, the salt tends to harden up at least it did for me. You could probably break it up and sift it. This article says the salt can be reused: http://www.thedailyspud.com/2009/10/11/spud-sunday-in-defence-of-salt/ You’ll definitely want to use the least expensive kosher salt you can find in case it needs to be discarded. Thanks again and hope you enjoy!