Miso Eggplant

5 from 2 votes
25 minutes
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This easy Miso Eggplant recipe is based on Nasu Dengaku, the classic Japanese starter that rocks with flavor! The umami-packed miso glaze comes together quickly, is then brushed onto baked eggplant, and a quick stint under the broiler adds lovely caramelized goodness! A great side for lettuce wraps!

Six Miso-Glazed Eggplant halves on metal tray garnished with sesame seeds and scallions.

Why This Recipe is a Keeper!

Eggplant is one of those things people love or avoid. Sometimes, however, one bite is all it takes to fall in love as my eggplant-skeptic husband did with my Air-Fryer Eggplant Fries.

This is one of those recipes!

The glaze has all the lovely Asian flavors going on: Miso, mirin, soy sauce, ginger, garlic, scallion, and sesame seeds. You’d have to visit an international market for some of these ingredients at one time, but now they’re all readily available at most grocery stores.

Miso Eggplant comes together in under 30 minutes. Serve it on the side with Asian Beef and Shishito Pepper Skewers or with rice or quinoa as part of an Asian-inspired meatless meal.

Let’s make it!

Miso-Glazed Eggplant on metal tray with sesame seeds and scallions.

How to Make Miso Eggplant:

Recipe Ingredients:

Here’s everything you’ll need to make this miso eggplant recipe, along with how to prep. See the recipe card below for the exact quantities.

Ingredients for Miso-Glazed Eggplant in glass bowls.

Ingredient Notes and Substitutions:

  • Eggplant: I used Japanese eggplant in this recipe, but you can use almost any type of eggplant, such as regular globe/American eggplant, which is found in any grocery store. Japanese eggplant is deep purple, long and slender, with delicate skin and a mild flavor.
  • Miso Paste: Miso is basically fermented soybean paste. There are three major types of miso: White miso (shiro miso), yellow miso (shinshu miso) and red miso (aka miso). I used white miso for this recipe, which is less salty than yellow or red because it’s not fermented as long. Here’s more information on the various types of miso from The Spruce Eats. Miso has many uses and lasts a long time in the refrigerator so it’s an Asian staple ingredient worth keeping around.
  • Mirin: Mirin is sweet rice wine and can be found near the other Asian pantry ingredients. If you can’t find it or don’t wish to buy it, add 1 teaspoon of granulated sugar to 2 tablespoons of dry white wine. NO-ALCOHOLIC SUBSTITUTE: Use 2 tablespoons of rice vinegar with 1 teaspoon of granulated sugar.
  • Soy Sauce: I use Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce because I find the taste of regular soy sauce a bit strong.

Step-By-Step Instructions:

  • Gather and prep all the ingredients.
  • Whisk together the first 6 ingredients (miso through garlic) in a small bowl and set aside.
Miso glaze in glass bowl.
  • Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. You’ll be using your broiler briefly after baking the eggplant. Avoid lining your baking sheet with parchment paper unless you remove it before broiling. A nonstick baking sheet works well here. If you wish to line your baking sheet, use regular or nonstick aluminum foil.
  • Cut the Japanese eggplant in half lengthwise. Brush with some canola or vegetable oil.
Six Japanese eggplant halves being brushed with oil.
  • Turn the eggplant cut side down on the baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until you can easily pierce the eggplant with a paring knife.
  • Turn on the broiler. Place a rack approximately 8 inches away from the element.
  • Turn the eggplant over and brush with the miso glaze, using it all.
Six Japanese eggplant halves being brushed with glaze.
  • Pop it into the oven underneath the broiler and broil for 3 minutes or until the glaze is lightly charred and caramelized. Keep an eye on it as it browns quickly!
  • This, friends!
Six broiled Japanese eggplant halves on stainless steel rimmed baking sheet.
  • Sprinkle toasted sesame seeds and scallions over the miso eggplant and serve!!!
  • I know you’ll enjoy this miso eggplant recipe because it’s sooo good!
Miso-Glazed Eggplant with scallions and sesame seeds scattered about.

Chef Tip:

  • While it’s possible to purchase toasted sesame seeds, it’s super easy to toast them yourself and the flavor will be superior. Simply place the sesame seeds in a dry nonstick skillet. Turn the heat to medium and toast for 3-4 minutes or until they begin to turn golden. They can burn quickly so keep an eye on them! Immediately transfer to a plate to cool.

Frequently Asked Questions:

How would I make Miso-Glazed Eggplant with regular globe (American) eggplant?

Select small to medium-sized globe (American) eggplant. Cut in half lengthwise. Score the inside flesh diagonally in two directions creating a criss-cross pattern. Brush with oil then bake at 400 degrees until tender and easily pierced with a paring knife. Proceed with brushing the cooked eggplant with the miso combination and broil as directed. If you only have very large eggplant, cut it into thick slices (1/2 to 3/4-inch), bake then brush with the miso blend and broil.

Can I grill the eggplant for miso-glazed eggplant?

Absolutely! Cook the eggplant cut side down over medium-low heat until it’s easily pierced with a knife. Then, turn it over, brush with the glaze, flip it back over then grill for no more than a minute!

How long does miso last in the refrigerator?

Miso can be kept in your refrigerator for a long period of time due to its high salt content. If refrigerated, miso does not go bad and can be stored for up to a year. However, the flavor may not hold up that long.

Miso-Glazed Eggplant on round metal pan garnished with scallions and sesame seeds.

Also great served with:

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Six Miso-Glazed Eggplant halves on metal tray garnished with sesame seeds and scallions.

Miso Eggplant

5 from 2 votes

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By: Carol | From A Chef’s Kitchen
This easy miso eggplant recipe is based on Nasu Dengaku, the classic Japanese starter that rocks with flavor! The umami-packed miso glaze comes together quickly, is then brushed onto baked eggplant and a quick stint under the broiler adds lovely caramelized goodness!
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Course Side Dishes – Vegetables
Cuisine Asian
Servings 6
Calories 107 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 2 tablespoons white miso
  • 2 tablespoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce - preferably low-sodium
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 3 cloves garlic - crushed through a garlic press
  • 3 Japanese eggplants - halved lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil - for brushing the eggplant
  • 1 scallion - thinly sliced diagonally, for garnish
  • toasted sesame seeds - for garnish

Instructions
 

  • Whisk together the first 6 ingredients (miso through garlic) in a small bowl and set aside.
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  • Lightly brush the halved eggplant with canola oil and place flesh side down on a nonstick baking sheet or baking sheet lined with regular or nonstick aluminum foil.
  • Bake for 15 minutes or until you can easily pierce the eggplants with a paring knife.
  • Preheat the broiler. Place a rack approximately 8 inches from the broiler.
  • Turn the eggplants over and brush with the miso glaze–using it all up.
  • Place under the broiler and broil for 3 minutes or until the glaze is lightly charred.
  • Sprinkle with sesame seeds and sliced scallion and serve immediately.

Notes

MAKE AHEAD:  The miso blend can be mixed together 1-2 days ahead of time.

Nutrition

Serving: 1 | Calories: 107kcal | Carbohydrates: 14g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 0.4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 0.02g | Sodium: 593mg | Potassium: 302mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 51IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1mg

These are estimated values generated from a nutritional database using unbranded products. Please do your own research with the products you’re using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

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Recipe Rating




4 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    We just had this with dinner and paired with with the Asian beef lettuce wraps. These eggplants were extremely easy to make and so packed with flavor. We did use low sodium soy sauce and salt level was perfect. I substituted mirin for sherry wine since it’s what I had. This will definitely be in our weekly rotation from now on. Compliments from everyone, the only downside you will not have any leftovers, lol. Five stars.

  2. Holy cow that was way too salty. I get miso and soy sauce are salty but wow I had to scrape it off the eggplants. Test your sauce before adding to the eggplants. Perhaps salt level in miso varies from brand to brand. Would have been really yummy had I added less miso and less soy.

    1. Hi, Grace, Thanks so much for your feedback. I’ve made a note to the recipe to use less sodium soy sauce. Not sure if miso brands vary with the salt level, but I’ll certainly check it out the next time I’m at a store with several brands. Thanks again.